The Value of Neuropsychological Assessment in the Differentiation Between Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Late-Onset Psychiatric Disorders

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OVERVIEW

How can you discriminate between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and psychiatric disorders with similar behavioral changes, such as apathy, disinhibition, reduced empathy, or compulsions? Which neuropsychological tests are useful?

To cite: Overbeek JM, Korten N, Gossink F, et al. The value of neuropsychological assessment in the differentiation between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and late-onset psychiatric disorders. J Clin Psychiatry. 2020;81(1):19m12811.

To share: https://doi.org/10.4088/JCP.19m12811


Read the whole article at psychiatrist.com here: 
The Value of Neuropsychological Assessment in the Differentiation Between Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Late-Onset Psychiatric Disorders

© Copyright 2020 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists

Learning Objectives

Incorporate a naming test to aid differentiation between bvFTD and a psychiatric disorder in patients presenting with late-onset frontal behavioral changes

Activity summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation
Activity opens: 
02/04/2020
Activity expires: 
02/28/2022
Cost:
$10.00
Rating: 
0

CME Background

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STATEMENT OF NEED AND PURPOSE

The large overlap in symptoms between bvFTD and psychiatric disorders makes the diagnostic differentiation challenging. In fact, a high proportion of bvFTD patients initially receive a psychiatric diagnosis, and significant time can pass before the right diagnosis is given. The reverse also occurs: patients with a psychiatric disorder incorrectly receive bvFTD diagnoses, preventing patients from receiving appropriate treatment. There is little literature comparing neuropsychological functioning between patients with bvFTD and psychiatric disorders. To narrow the diagnostic practice gap, clinicians need education on new research that evaluates which neuropsychological tests can discriminate between bvFTD and psychiatric diagnoses.

Release, Expiration, and Review Dates

This educational activity was published in February 2020 and is eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ through February 28, 2022. The latest review of this material was January 2020.

Disclosure of off-label usage

The authors have determined that, to the best of their knowledge, no investigational information about pharmaceutical agents or device therapies that is outside US Food and Drug Administration–approved labeling has been presented in this article.

Funding/support

There was no direct funding for this study; the test procedures were part of regular patient care. In general, research of the Alzheimer Center Amsterdam is part of the neurodegeneration research program of the Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam. The Alzheimer Center Amsterdam is supported by Alzheimer Nederland and Stichting VUmc funds.

Previous presentation

11th International Conference on Frontotemporal Dementias, November 11–14, 2018; Sydney, Australia ▪ Annual Congress of the Dutch Psychiatry Association, Maastricht, The Netherlands; April 3–5, 2019.

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful to Ina Foy and Alex Leighton, MSc, for assisting with editing. They have no personal affiliations or financial relationships with any commercial interest to disclose relative to the article.

FACULTY

Jozefien M. Overbeek, MSc*
Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam UMC, Location VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Nicole Korten, MSc, PhD
Department of Old Age Psychiatry, GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Flora Gossink, MD, PhD
Department of Old Age Psychiatry, GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Jay Fieldhouse, MSc
Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam UMC, Location VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Marleen van de Beek, MSc
Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam UMC, Location VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Lianne Reus, MSc
Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam UMC, Location VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Annemieke Dols, MD, PhD
Department of Old Age Psychiatry, GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Yolande Pijnenburg, MD, PhD
Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam UMC, Location VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Sigfried Schouws, MSc, PhD
Department of Old Age Psychiatry, GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

*Corresponding author: Jozefien M. Overbeek, MSc, Alzheimer Center, Postbus 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (joverbeek@amstelring.nl).

FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

All individuals in a position to influence the content of this activity were asked to complete a statement regarding all relevant personal financial relationships between themselves or their spouse/partner and any commercial interest. The CME Institute has resolved any conflicts of interest that were identified. In the past year, Marlene P. Freeman, MD, Editor in Chief of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, has received research funding from JayMac and Sage; has been a member of the advisory boards for Otsuka, Alkermes, and Sunovion; has been a member of the Independent Data Safety and Monitoring Committee for Janssen; has been a member of the Steering Committee for Educational Activities for Medscape; and, as a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) employee, works with the MGH National Pregnancy Registry, which is sponsored by Teva, Alkermes, Otsuka, Actavis, and Sunovion, and works with the MGH Clinical Trials Network and Institute, which receives research funding from multiple pharmaceutical companies and the National Institute of Mental Health. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships.

Dr Pijnenburg received a personal fellowship from the Dutch Brain Foundation. Mss OverbeekFieldhouse, van de Beek, and Reus and Drs KortenGossinkDols, and Schouws have no personal affiliations or financial relationships with any commercial interest to disclose relative to the article.

Accreditation Statement

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Note: The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accept certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

Available Credit

  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation

Price

Cost:
$10.00
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