Treatment of Common Mental Disorders in the United States: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III

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Overview

When patients present for treatment of anxiety or mood disorders, do you consider whether there is also an untreated substance use disorder? Review the data.


Read the whole article at psychiatrist.com here:
Treatment of Common Mental Disorders in the United States: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III

© Copyright 2019 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists

Learning Objectives

After completing this educational activity, you should be able to:

  • Provide screening and, if necessary, treatment for comorbid substance use disorders in patients with mood or anxiety disorders
Activity summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation
Activity opens: 
05/31/2019
Activity expires: 
06/30/2021
Cost:
$10.00
Rating: 
0

CME Background

Articles are selected for credit designation based on an assessment of the educational needs of CME participants, with the purpose of providing readers with a curriculum of CME articles on a variety of topics throughout each volume. Activities are planned using a process that links identified needs with desired results.

CME Objective

After studying this article, you should be able to:

  • Provide screening and, if necessary, treatment for comorbid substance use disorders in patients with mood or anxiety disorders

Statement of Need and Purpose

In the US, half or more of adults and youths with a mental disorder did not receive treatment in the previous year. Barriers to treatment include stigma and financial limitations. Treatment is too often not targeted to the individuals most in need, and those who do receive treatment too often have care that does not meet clinical practice guidelines. Clinicians need education on encouraging patient empowerment, providing psychoeducation, facilitating access for patients to mental health services, and providing optimal care.

Release, Expiration, and Review Dates

This educational activity was published in May 2019 and is eligible for AAMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ through June 30, 2021. The latest review of this material was April 2019.

Disclosure of off-label usage

The authors have determined that, to the best of their knowledge, no investigational information about pharmaceutical agents that is outside US Food and Drug Administration-approved labeling has been presented in this article.

Funding/support

Work on this manuscript was supported by National Institutes of Health grant DA019606 (Drs Olfson and Wall and Ms Liu). The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions was sponsored by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and funded, in part, by the Intramural Program, NIAAA, National Institutes of Health.

Role of the sponsor

The sponsors had no additional role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; and preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript.

Disclaimer

The views expressed in this manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of National Institutes of Health and Human Services or the US Government.

Faculty Affiliation

Mark Olfson, MD, MPH*
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York

Carlos Blanco, MD, PhD
Division of Epidemiology, Services, and Prevention Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Rockville, Maryland

Melanie M. Wall, PhD
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York

Shang-Min Liu, MS
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York

Bridget F. Grant, PhD, PhD
Division of Biometry and Epidemiology, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, Maryland

*Corresponding author: Mark Olfson, MD, MPH, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1051 Riverside Dr, New York, NY 10032 (mo49@cumc.columbia.edu).

Financial Disclosure

All individuals in a position to influence the content of this activity were asked to complete a statement regarding all relevant personal financial relationships between themselves or their spouse/partner and any commercial interest. The CME Institute has resolved any conflicts of interest that were identified. In the past year, Marlene P. Freeman, MD, Editor in Chief of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, has received research funding from JayMac and Sage; has been a member of the advisory boards for Otsuka, Alkermes, and Sunovion; has been a member of the Independent Data Safety and Monitoring Committee for Janssen; and, as a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) employee, works with the MGH National Pregnancy Registry, which is sponsored by Teva, Alkermes, Otsuka, Actavis, and Sunovion, and works with the MGH Clinical Trials Network and Institute, which receives research funding from multiple pharmaceutical companies and the National Institute of Mental Health. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships.

Dr Blanco’s work on this manuscript was part of his previous employment at Columbia University. Drs Olfson, Wall, and Grant and Ms Liu have no personal affiliations or financial relationships with any commercial interest to disclose relative to the article.

Accreditation Statement

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Note: The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accept certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

Available Credit

  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation

Price

Cost:
$10.00
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