Psychiatric Prodrome in Anti-NMDAR–Associated Encephalopathy: Clinical and Pathophysiologic Considerations

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Overview

In addition to psychosis, depressive symptoms can occur in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalopathy (ANMDARE). ANDMARE should be considered in patients presenting with psychotic or atypical depressive illnesses. Early recognition of ANMDARE could lead to better management of this potentially life-threatening autoimmune disorder.


Read the whole article at psychiatrist.com here:
Psychiatric Prodrome in Anti-NMDAR–Associated Encephalopathy: Clinical and Pathophysiologic Considerations

© Copyright 2020 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Target Audience

Primary care clinicians

Learning Objectives

Include anti-NMDA receptor encephalopathy in the differential diagnosis of patients with psychotic and depressive symptoms

Activity summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation
Activity opens: 
06/18/2020
Activity expires: 
06/30/2022
Cost:
$10.00
Rating: 
0

CME Background

Articles are selected for credit designation based on an assessment of the educational needs of CME participants, with the purpose of providing readers with a curriculum of CME articles on a variety of topics throughout each volume. Activities are planned using a process that links identified needs with desired results.

CME Objective

After studying this article, you should be able to:

  • Include anti-NMDA receptor encephalopathy in the differential diagnosis of patients with psychotic and depressive symptoms

Statement of Need and Purpose

Anti-NMDA receptor encephalopathy (ANMDARE) is a recently identified condition associated with early symptoms of psychosis and/or depression, meaning that it is easily misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder. ANMDARE is treatable, but it can be fatal if untreated, meaning that clinicians need education about its variable presentation, useful diagnostic tools, and treatment options.

Release, Expiration, and Review Dates

This educational activity was published in June 2020 and is eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ through July 31, 2022. The latest review of this material was June 2020.

Disclosure of off-label usage

The authors have determined that, to the best of their knowledge, no investigational information about pharmaceutical agents or device therapies that is outside US Food and Drug Administration–approved labeling has been presented in this article.

Funding/support

None.

Faculty Affiliation

Anh-Vu Nguyen, MD
Department of Psychiatry, Baylor Scott & White Health, Central Texas Division and College of Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, Temple, Texas
 

Keith A. Young, PhD
Department of Psychiatry, Baylor Scott & White Health, Central Texas Division and College of Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, Temple, Texas
 

James A. Bourgeois, OD, MD, FACLP*
Department of Psychiatry, Baylor Scott & White Health, Central Texas Division and College of Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, Temple, Texas


*Corresponding author: James A. Bourgeois, OD, MD, FACLP, Department of Psychiatry, Baylor Scott & White Health, Central Texas Division, 2401 South 31st St, Temple TX 76508 (James.Bourgeois@BSWHealth.org).

Financial Disclosure

All individuals in a position to influence the content of this activity were asked to complete a statement regarding all relevant personal financial relationships between themselves or their spouse/partner and any commercial interest. The CME Institute has resolved any conflicts of interest that were identified. In the past year, Larry Culpepper, MD, MPH, Editor in Chief of The Primary Care Companion for CNS Disorders, has been a consultant for Acadia, Allergan, Eisai, Merck, Supernus, and Takeda; has been a stock shareholder of M-3 Information; and has received royalties from UpToDate and Oxford University Press. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships. 

Drs NguyenYoung, and Bourgeois have no personal affiliations or financial relationships with any commercial interest to disclose relative to the article.

Accreditation Statement

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

 

 

Credit Designation

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Note: The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accept certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

Available Credit

  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation

Price

Cost:
$10.00
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