Prevalent Gaps in Understanding the Features of Catatonia Among Psychiatrists, Psychiatry Trainees, and Medical Students

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Overview

Underdiagnosis of catatonia may occur because of its heterogeneous phenotypes and a lack of harmony between the DSM-5 and the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale.


Read the whole article at psychiatrist.com here: 
Prevalent Gaps in Understanding the Features of Catatonia Among Psychiatrists, Psychiatry Trainees, and Medical Students

© Copyright 2021 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists

Learning Objectives

Avoid common errors in the identification of catatonia

Activity summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation
Activity opens: 
08/17/2021
Activity expires: 
08/31/2023
Cost:
$10.00
Rating: 
0

CME Background

Articles are selected for credit designation based on an assessment of the educational needs of CME participants, with the purpose of providing readers with a curriculum of CME articles on a variety of topics throughout each volume. Activities are planned using a process that links identified needs with desired results.

CME Objective

After studying this article, you should be able to:

  • Avoid common errors in the identification of catatonia

Statement of Need and Purpose

Catatonia is a serious, potentially life-threatening condition that affects patients across a variety of primary psychiatric disorders. Appropriate and timely identification of catatonia is essential; however, diagnosis can be difficult, and clinicians may overestimate their ability to detect it. Education about how to accurately diagnose catatonia is needed.

Release, Expiration, and Review Dates

This educational activity was published in August 2021 and is eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ through August 31, 2023. The latest review of this material was July 2021.

Disclosure of Off-Label Usage

The authors have determined that, to the best of their knowledge, no investigational information about pharmaceutical agents or device therapies that is outside US Food and Drug Administration–approved labeling has been presented in this activity.

Funding/Support

This project was supported by the Department of Psychiatry University of Rochester Medical Center, including internal funds for development of the educational materials and statistical analysis by the Quantitative Methods Core. This study received no external funding.

Faculty Affiliation


Joshua R. Wortzel, MD*
Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York
 


Daniel D. Maeng, PhD
Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York
 


Andrew Francis, PhD, MD
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania
 


Mark A. Oldham, MD
Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York
 


*Corresponding author: Joshua R. Wortzel, MD, 300 Crittenden Blvd, Box PSYCH Rochester, NY 14642 (joshua_wortzel@URMC.rochester.edu).

Financial Disclosure

All individuals in a position to influence the content of this activity were asked to complete a statement regarding all relevant personal financial relationships between themselves or their spouse/partner and any commercial interest. The CME Institute has resolved any conflicts of interest that were identified. In the past year, Marlene P. Freeman, MD, Editor in Chief of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, has received research funding from JayMac and Sage; has been a member of the advisory boards for Otsuka, Alkermes, and Sunovion; has been a member of the Independent Data Safety and Monitoring Committee for Janssen; has been a member of the Steering Committee for Educational Activities for Medscape; and, as a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) employee, works with the MGH National Pregnancy Registry, which is sponsored by Teva, Alkermes, Otsuka, Actavis, and Sunovion, and works with the MGH Clinical Trials Network and Institute, which receives research funding from multiple pharmaceutical companies and the National Institute of Mental Health. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships.

The authors have no personal affiliations or financial relationships with any commercial interest to disclose relative to the article.

Accreditation Statement

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Note: The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accept certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

Available Credit

  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation

Price

Cost:
$10.00
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