Measurement-Based Care for Psychotic Disorders in the Veterans Health Administration: Current Practices and Future Directions

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Overview

Measurement-based care (MBC) can improve patient outcomes, but data on its use in psychosis are sparse. This study examined the use of patient-reported outcome measures in veterans with psychosis to identify candidate measures for psychosis-related MBC.


Read the whole article at psychiatrist.com here: 
Measurement-Based Care for Psychotic Disorders in the Veterans Health Administration: Current Practices and Future Directions 

© Copyright 2022 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists

Learning Objectives

Incorporate measurement-based care into treatment for psychotic disorders

Activity summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation
Activity opens: 
03/01/2022
Activity expires: 
04/30/2024
Cost:
$10.00

CME Background

Articles are selected for credit designation based on an assessment of the educational needs of CME participants, with the purpose of providing readers with a curriculum of CME articles on a variety of topics throughout each volume. Activities are planned using a process that links identified needs with desired results.

CME Objective

After studying this article, you should be able to:

  • Incorporate measurement-based care into treatment for psychotic disorders

Statement of Need and Purpose

Use of MBC in mental health care lags behind its use in medicine overall, and data on using MBC in treating psychotic disorders are particularly sparse. Although subjectivity and context should continue to inform clinical decision-making in psychiatry, education on the current actual use of outcome measures for psychosis treatment could help guide practitioners to better quantify—and clarify—desired treatment outcomes for their patients with these disorders.

Release, Expiration, and Review Dates

This educational activity was published in March 2022 and is eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ through April 30, 2024 . The latest review of this material was February 2022.

Disclosure of Off-Label Usage

Dr Stacy has determined that, to the best of her knowledge, no investigational information about pharmaceutical agents or device therapies that is outside US Food and Drug Administration–approved labeling has been presented in this article. 

Funding/Support

The authors are employees of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). This material is based upon work supported in part by the Department of Veteran Affairs Office of Academic Affiliations, Inter-Professional  advanced Fellowship in Addiction. The authors have no conflicts of interest.

Role of the Sponsor

The VHA had no role in the conduct or reporting of this study.

Additional Information

Data from the VHA Corporate Data Warehouse are stored within VHA servers and are not on a URL or accessible by the public.

Faculty Affiliation


Edward P. Liebmann, PhD
Department of Psychology, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut and Yale School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, Connecticut



Sandra G. Resnick, PhD
Yale School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, Connecticut and Office of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention, VA Central Office, Washington, DC



Meaghan A. Stacy, PhD*
Yale School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, Connecticut and Office of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention, VA Central Office, Washington, DC

 

*Corresponding author: Meaghan Stacy, PhD, Department of Psychology, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, 950 Campbell Ave – 116B, West Haven, CT 06516 (meaghan.stacy@yale.edu).

Financial Disclosure 

All individuals in a position to influence the content of this activity were asked to disclose all personal financial relationships between themselves and any ACCME-defined ineligible companies. The CME Institute has mitigated any relevant financial relationships that were identified. In the past 3 years, Marlene P. Freeman, MD, Editor in Chief of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, has received research funding from JayMac and Sage; has been a member of the Independent Data Safety and Monitoring Committee for Janssen (Johnson & Johnson), Novartis, and Neurocrine; and has served on advisory boards for Eliem and Sage. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships..

The authors are employees of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). This material is based upon work supported in part by the Department of Veteran Affairs Office of Academic Affiliations, Inter-Professional Advanced Fellowship in Addiction. The authors have no conflicts of interest.

Accreditation Statement

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Note: The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accept certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

Available Credit

  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation

Price

Cost:
$10.00
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