Hypertensive Urgency and Emergency in Alcohol Withdrawal: A Literature Review

Instructions

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Overview

Data are lacking on how best to manage hypertension in patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal. Read this CME article for strategies.


Read the whole article at psychiatrist.com here:
Hypertensive Urgency and Emergency in Alcohol Withdrawal: A Literature Review

© Copyright 2019 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Target Audience

Primary care clinicians

Learning Objectives

Manage hypertension in patients withdrawing from alcohol to prevent hypertensive urgency and emergency

Activity summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation
Activity opens: 
12/12/2019
Activity expires: 
12/31/2021
Cost:
$10.00
Rating: 
0

CME Background

Articles are selected for credit designation based on an assessment of the educational needs of CME participants, with the purpose of providing readers with a curriculum of CME articles on a variety of topics throughout each volume. This special series of case reports about dementia was deemed valuable for educational purposes by the Publisher, Editor in Chief, and CME Institute staff. Activities are planned using a process that links identified needs with desired results.

CME Objective

After studying this article, you should be able to:

  • Manage hypertension in patients withdrawing from alcohol to prevent hypertensive urgency and emergency

Statement of Need and Purpose

Although hypertension can occur in patients detoxifying from chronic alcohol use, guidance for optimal management of hypertensive emergency is extremely limited. To minimize the risk of serious outcomes such as organ damage, clinicians need education about new research.

Release, Expiration, and Review Dates

This educational activity was published in December 2019 and is eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ through December 31, 2021. The latest review of this material was December 2019.

Disclosure of off-label usage

The authors have determined that, to the best of their knowledge, cytoflavin, dexmedetomidine, and ketamine are not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of hypertension in alcohol withdrawal.

Funding/support

None.

Faculty Affiliation

Ermal Bojdani, MD*
Harvard South Shore Psychiatry Residency Training Program, Brockton, Massachusetts; VA Boston Healthcare System, Brockton, Massachusetts; and Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

Anderson Chen, MD
Harvard South Shore Psychiatry Residency Training Program, Brockton, Massachusetts; VA Boston Healthcare System, Brockton, Massachusetts; and Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

Tina Zhang, BS
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts

Nida Naqvi, MD, MBS
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Medical Center, Bel Air, Maryland

Dil Tahera, MD
VA Boston Healthcare System, Brockton, Massachusetts, and Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

*Corresponding author: Ermal Bojdani, MD, Harvard South Shore Psychiatry Residency Training Program, 940 Belmont St, Brockton, MA 02301 (Bojdani2@gmail.com).

Financial Disclosure

All individuals in a position to influence the content of this activity were asked to complete a statement regarding all relevant personal financial relationships between themselves or their spouse/partner and any commercial interest. The CME Institute has resolved any conflicts of interest that were identified. In the past year, Larry Culpepper, MD, MPH, Editor in Chief of The Primary Care Companion for CNS Disorders, has been a consultant for Alkermes, Harmony Biosciences, Merck, Shire, Supernus, and Sunovion. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships.

Drs BojdaniChenNaqvi, and Tahera and Ms Zhang have no personal affiliations or financial relationships with any commercial interest to disclose relative to this article.

Accreditation Statement

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

 

 

Credit Designation

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Note: The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accept certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

Available Credit

  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation

Price

Cost:
$10.00
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