High Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Bipolar Disorder

Instructions

Click the red REGISTER button to pay the $10 fee and take the posttest
Click here to return to the JCP CME article.

Overview

Little is known about increased metabolic syndrome (MetS) prevalence in adolescents and youth with bipolar disorder. Read this journal CME article for more.


Read the whole article at psychiatrist.com here: 
High Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Bipolar Disorder

© Copyright 2019 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists

Learning Objectives

Integrate strategies focused on modifying risk factors for metabolic syndrome in the management of bipolar disorder in young patients

Activity summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation
Activity opens: 
07/30/2019
Activity expires: 
08/31/2021
Cost:
$10.00
Rating: 
0

CME Background

Articles are selected for credit designation based on an assessment of the educational needs of CME participants, with the purpose of providing readers with a curriculum of CME articles on a variety of topics throughout each volume. Activities are planned using a process that links identified needs with desired results.

CME Objective

After studying this article, you should be able to:

  • Integrate strategies focused on modifying risk factors for metabolic syndrome in the management of bipolar disorder in young patients

Statement of Need and Purpose

More than half of patients with BD are either overweight or obese, and the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is greatest in young people with severe mental illness and those treated with antipsychotics. Despite clinical recommendations to manage weight gain and monitor metabolic side effects in young patients taking antipsychotics, few are adequately monitored. Clinicians need education about early identification of weight gain and MetS in young patients taking antipsychotic medications to reduce morbidity and mortality in adulthood.

Release, Expiration, and Review Dates

This educational activity was published in July 2019 and is eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ through August 31, 2021. The latest review of this material was July 2019.

Disclosure of off-label usage

The authors have determined that, to the best of their knowledge, carbamazepine and divalproex are not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of bipolar disorder in youth, and lithium is approved only in youth 12 years and older for the treatment and prevention of mania.

Funding/support

This research was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Course and Outcome of Bipolar Youth (COBY) study grants MH059929 (Dr Birmaher), MH59691 (Dr Keller/Dr Yen), and MH59977 (Dr Strober).

Role of the sponsor

No funding agency provided direct support in the conduct and/or publication of the study.

Acknowledgments

The authors thank the study participants and families for their participation, the COBY research team, and NIMH for their support.

Faculty Affiliation

Christine Li, MD
Centre for Youth Bipolar Disorder, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, and University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Boris Birmaher, MD
Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Brian Rooks, PhD
Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Mary Kay Gill, MSN, JD
Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Heather Hower, MSW
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

David A. Axelson, MD
Department of Psychiatry, Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio

Daniel P. Dickstein, MD
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, and Bradley Hospital, Riverside, Rhode Island

Tina R. Goldstein, PhD
Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Fangzi Liao, MS
Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Shirley Yen, PhD
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence; Butler Hospital, Riverside, Rhode Island; and Massachusetts Mental Health Center and Department of Psychiatry, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (current affiliation)

Jeffrey Hunt, MD
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, and Bradley Hospital, Riverside, Rhode Island

Satish Iyengar, PhD
Department of Statistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Neal D. Ryan, MD
Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Michael A. Strober, PhD
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, California

Martin B. Keller, MD
Butler Hospital, Riverside, Rhode Island

Benjamin I. Goldstein, MD, PhD*
Centre for Youth Bipolar Disorder, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, and University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

*Corresponding author: Benjamin I. Goldstein, MD, PhD, Centre for Youth Bipolar Disorder, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave, EG-48, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (benjamin.goldstein@sunnybrook.ca).

Financial Disclosure

All individuals in a position to influence the content of this activity were asked to complete a statement regarding all relevant personal financial relationships between themselves or their spouse/partner and any commercial interest. The CME Institute has resolved any conflicts of interest that were identified. In the past year, Marlene P. Freeman, MD, Editor in Chief of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, has received research funding from JayMac and Sage; has been a member of the advisory boards for Otsuka, Alkermes, and Sunovion; has been a member of the Independent Data Safety and Monitoring Committee for Janssen; and, as a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) employee, works with the MGH National Pregnancy Registry, which is sponsored by Teva, Alkermes, Otsuka, Actavis, and Sunovion, and works with the MGH Clinical Trials Network and Institute, which receives research funding from multiple pharmaceutical companies and the National Institute of Mental Health. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships.

Dr Axelson has served as a consultant for Janssen Research and received royalties from UpToDate. Dr Birmaher receives or will receive royalties for publications from Random House, Inc. (New Hope for Children and Teens with Bipolar Disorder), Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (Treating Child and Adolescent Depression), and UpToDate. He is employed by the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center/Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic and receives research funding from National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Dr Dickstein received grant support from NIMH and an independent investigator grant from the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD). Ms Gill receives grant support from NIMH. Dr B. I. Goldstein received grant or research support from NARSAD, Brain Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, NIMH, the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation, and University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry. Dr T. R. Goldstein receives grant support from NIMH, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation and royalties from Guilford Press. Ms Hower receives grant support from NIMH. Dr Hunt receives grant support from NIMH and honoraria from Wiley Publishers as a Senior Editor of the Brown University Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology Update. Drs Iyengar, Keller, and Rooks and Ms Liao receive grant support from NIMH. Dr Keller receives grant support from the John J. McDonnell and Margaret T. O’Brien Foundation. Dr Ryan received grant or research support from NIMH and served on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Child Mind Institute. Dr Strober receives grant support from NIMH and support from the Resnick Endowed Chair in Eating Disorders at UCLA. Dr Yen receives grant support from NIMH and American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and is a consultant at Janssen Research and Development, LLC. Dr Li has no personal affiliations or financial relationships with any commercial interest to disclose relative to this article.

Accreditation Statement

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Note: The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accept certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

Available Credit

  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation

Price

Cost:
$10.00
Please login or register to take this activity.

Register for free on our site to participate in this and many free CME courses. There is a $10 processing fee for this activity.