Early Stabilization of Weight Changes Following Treatment With Olanzapine, Risperidone, and Aripiprazole: A 12-Month Naturalistic Study of First Episode Psychosis

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Overview

When does antipsychotic-induced weight gain occur? Are preventive interventions warranted at the time of antipsychotic initiation in medication-naive, first-episode patients?


Read the whole article at psychiatrist.com here:
Early Stabilization of Weight Changes Following Treatment With Olanzapine, Risperidone, and Aripiprazole: A 12-Month Naturalistic Study of First Episode Psychosis

© Copyright 2019 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists

Learning Objectives

Implement evidence-based interventions to prevent antipsychotic-induced weight gain at the beginning of treatment

Activity summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation
Activity opens: 
08/27/2019
Activity expires: 
09/30/2021
Cost:
$10.00
Rating: 
0

CME Background

Articles are selected for credit designation based on an assessment of the educational needs of CME participants, with the purpose of providing readers with a curriculum of CME articles on a variety of topics throughout each volume. Activities are planned using a process that links identified needs with desired results.

CME Objective

After studying this article, you should be able to:

  • Implement evidence-based interventions to prevent antipsychotic-induced weight gain at the beginning of treatment

Statement of Need and Purpose

Weight gain is a well-known side effect of antipsychotic treatment. Clinicians need to consider how to prevent or minimize weight gain—and its associated health risks—when beginning treatment for first-episode patients. Clinicians have insufficient rates of monitoring cardiometabolic side effects of antipsychotics, including weight gain, despite the recommendations of multiple guidelines, which is all the more reason that prevention of weight gain is important. Psychiatrists need education to expand their scope of practice to manage cardiovascular risk factors, such as possible prevention of weight gain.

Release, Expiration, and Review Dates

This educational activity was published in August 2019 and is eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ through September 30, 2021. The latest review of this material was August 2019.

Disclosure of Off-Label Usage

The authors have determined that, to the best of their knowledge, metformin is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the prevention of antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

Funding/Support

This study is part of a longitudinal project on outcome in first episode psychosis and early intervention. No specific funding was obtained for this aspect of the project. Funding for the larger project has been received from multiple sources including Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), National Institute of Mental Health (US; MH093303), and investigator-initiated studies funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca, and Pfizer. In addition, Dr Malla is funded by the Canada Research Chairs Program; Dr Iyer received a CIHR New Investigator Award; Drs Iyer, Shah, and Joober received a Fonds de Recherche du Québec—Santé (FRQS) Clinician-Scientist Award; and Dr Lepage received an FRQS Research Chair award.

Role of the sponsor

The funding agencies had no role in the conduct or publication of the study.

Previous presentation

Presented as a short oral communication at the World Psychiatric Association (WPA) congress, Mexico City, Mexico, September 26–30, 2018.

Faculty Affiliation

Sally Mustafa, PhD
Douglas Institute, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Ridha Joober, MD, PhD
Douglas Institute, Montréal, and Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Srividya Iyer, PhD
Douglas Institute, Montréal, and Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Jai Shah, MD, FRCPC
Douglas Institute, Montréal, and Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Martin Lepage, PhD
Douglas Institute, Montréal, and Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Ashok Malla, MBBS, FRCPC*
Douglas Institute, Montréal, and Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

*Corresponding author: Ashok Malla, MBBS, FRCPC, 6625, boulevard LaSalle, Montréal, QC, H4H 1R3, Canada (ashok.malla@mcgill.ca).

Financial Disclosure

All individuals in a position to influence the content of this activity were asked to complete a statement regarding all relevant personal financial relationships between themselves or their spouse/partner and any commercial interest. The CME Institute has resolved any conflicts of interest that were identified. In the past year, Marlene P. Freeman, MD, Editor in Chief of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, has received research funding from JayMac and Sage; has been a member of the advisory boards for Otsuka, Alkermes, and Sunovion; has been a member of the Independent Data Safety and Monitoring Committee for Janssen; and, as a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) employee, works with the MGH National Pregnancy Registry, which is sponsored by Teva, Alkermes, Otsuka, Actavis, and Sunovion, and works with the MGH Clinical Trials Network and Institute, which receives research funding from multiple pharmaceutical companies and the National Institute of Mental Health. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships.

Dr Joober is a speaker and/or consultant for Pfizer, Janssen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Sunovion, Mylan, Otsuka, Lundbeck, Shire, and Purdue; has received grants from Janssen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Otsuka, Lundbeck, AstraZeneca, and HLS; and has received royalties from Henry Stewart Talks, all of which are unrelated to the present article. Dr Lepage has received grants from Otsuka Lundbeck Alliance and Janssen and personal fees from Otsuka Canada, Lundbeck Canada, Janssen, MedAvante-Prophase, and Amplexor, all of which are unrelated to the present article. Dr Malla has received honoraria for speaking at conferences sponsored by Otsuka and Lundbeck (Canada and Global) and consulting with Otsuka and Lundbeck. Drs Mustafa, Iyer, and Shah have no personal affiliations or financial relationships with any commercial interest to disclose relative to the article.

Accreditation Statement

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Note: The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accept certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

Available Credit

  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation

Price

Cost:
$10.00
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