Bridging Community Mental Health and Primary Care to Improve Medication Monitoring and Outcomes for Patients With Mental Illness Taking Second-Generation Antipsychotics—HDC/DFMC Bridge Project, Phase 1: Group Concept Mapping

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Overview

Care coordination across health systems is critical to optimize patient care for chronic medical and psychiatric conditions. Group concept mapping provides a strategic process to allow shared-decision making among stakeholders.


Read the whole article at psychiatrist.com here:
Bridging Community Mental Health and Primary Care to Improve Medication Monitoring and Outcomes for Patients With Mental Illness Taking Second-Generation Antipsychotics—HDC/DFMC Bridge Project, Phase 1: Group Concept Mapping

© Copyright 2019 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Target Audience

Primary care clinicians

Learning Objectives

Take steps to improve coordination of medical and psychiatric care for patients with severe mental illness (eg, those taking second-generation antipsychotics who need metabolic monitoring)

Activity summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation
Activity opens: 
07/18/2019
Activity expires: 
08/31/2021
Cost:
$10.00
Rating: 
0

CME Background

Articles are selected for credit designation based on an assessment of the educational needs of CME participants, with the purpose of providing readers with a curriculum of CME articles on a variety of topics throughout each volume. Activities are planned using a process that links identified needs with desired results.

CME Objective

After studying this article, you should be able to:

  • Take steps to improve coordination of medical and psychiatric care for patients with severe mental illness (eg, those taking second-generation antipsychotics who need metabolic monitoring)

Statement of Need and Purpose

People with SMI have a high prevalence of somatic conditions compared to the general population. For example, patients who are taking SGAs are at risk for metabolic syndrome. Despite guidelines recommending that clinicians obtain measures of metabolic parameters in patients taking SGAs at baseline and throughout treatment, monitoring rates are low. Clinicians need education about ways to (1) comply with health monitoring guidelines for patients taking SGAs and (2) improve collaboration that addresses both the mental and physical health of patients.

Release, Expiration, and Review Dates

This educational activity was published in July 2019 and is eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ through August 31, 2021. The latest review of this material was July 2019.

Disclosure of off-label usage

The authors have determined that, to the best of their knowledge, no investigational information about pharmaceutical agents that is outside US Food and Drug Administration-approved labeling has been presented in this article.

Funding/support

This work was supported by a Minnesota Department of Health Rural Family Medicine Residency Grant.

Role of the sponsor

The sponsor played no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of data; or preparation, review or approval of the manuscript.

Previous presentation

A subset of the manuscript was presented by Ms O’ Donnell as a poster at the Annual Meeting of the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP); April 7-10, 2019; Salt Lake City, Utah.

Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge the Interprofessional Education and Practice Development Collaborative; John Wood, MD, University of Minnesota Duluth Family Medicine Residency Program Director; Lisa Prusak, MD, University of Minnesota Duluth Family Medicine Residency Associate Program Director; Steve Bauer, MD, Human Development Center Medical Director; and Matthew B. Hammitt, Human Development Center Health Information Manager. The acknowledged individuals report no conflicts of interest related to the subject of this article.

Faculty Affiliation

Keri Hager, PharmD, BCACP*
Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Duluth, Minnesota

Margarette Kading, PharmD, PhD
Independent consultant, Duluth, Minnesota

Carolyn O’ Donnella; Ann Yapel, PharmD, BCACP
Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, and Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Family Medicine Clinic, Duluth, Minnesota

Danielle MacDonald, PharmD, BCACP
Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, and Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Family Medicine Clinic, Duluth, Minnesota

Jennifer Nelson Albee, MSW, LICSW
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Family Medicine Clinic, Duluth, Minnesota

Cynthia Nash, RN, BSN
Duluth Family Medicine Clinic, Duluth, Minnesota

Colleen Renier, BS
eEssentia Institute of Rural Health, Duluth, Minnesota

Katherine Dean, MBA
eEssentia Institute of Rural Health, Duluth, Minnesota

Mark Schneiderhan, PharmD, BCPP
Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Duluth, Minnesota

*Corresponding author: Keri D. Hager, PharmD, BCACP, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, 211 Life Science, 1110 Kirby Dr, Duluth, MN 55812 (khager@umn.edu).

Financial Disclosure

All individuals in a position to influence the content of this activity were asked to complete a statement regarding all relevant personal financial relationships between themselves or their spouse/partner and any commercial interest. The CME Institute has resolved any conflicts of interest that were identified. In the past year, Larry Culpepper, MD, MPH, Editor in Chief of The Primary Care Companion for CNS Disorders, has been a consultant for Alkermes, Harmony Biosciences, Merck, Shire, Supernus, and Sunovion. No member of the CME Institute staff reported any relevant personal financial relationships.

Drs Hager, Kading, Yapel, MacDonald, and Schneiderhan and Mss O’Donnell, Nelson Albee, Nash, Renier, and Dean have no personal affiliations or financial relationships with any commercial interest to disclose relative to this article.

Accreditation Statement

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The CME Institute of Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Note: The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accept certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

Available Credit

  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • 1.00 Participation

Price

Cost:
$10.00
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